Dog care – Vaccines

dog vaccine

Puppy vaccines protect your new pet

Puppy vaccines

Vaccinations (immunizations, “shots”) have saved the lives of millions of dogs and people, some disease like polio have been completely eradicated in North America. The frequency of serious dog disease like Parvovirus and distemper has dropped dramatically over the last 20 years, due to protective vaccionations.

Current vaccination programs protect our dog, and us, from the threat of rabies.

Newer vaccines, including those administered through the nostrils, have been developed to protect against a variety of infections.Certainly routine vaccinations are essential for prevention of infectious diseases in puppies.

Puppies receive immunity against infectious disease in their mother’s milk; however, this protection begins to disappear between 6 and 20 weeks of age.

Puppies 4 to 20 weeks of age

To protect puppies during this critical time, a well-researched approach is taken: a series of vaccines is given every 3-4 weeks until the chance of contracting an infectious disease is very low.

The typical vaccine is a “combination” that protects against canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus, parainfluenza, and canine parvovirus (the four viruses are commonly abbreviated DHPP).

Newer vaccines effective against specific forms of the bacteria leptospirosis is important in our region Rabies vaccines are given between 16 and 20weeks of age.

All vaccines require booster immunizations (“shots”) that are given one year later. Thereafter, we will administer some vaccinations every 3 years while other will need to be given every year.

Vaccines can save your dog’s life

vaccines for dog

Vaccinations (immunizations, “shots”) have saved the lives of millions of dogs.

Current vaccination programs protect our dog, and us, from the threat of rabies. Newer vaccines, including those administered through the nostrils, have been developed to protect against a variety of infections.

Thereafter, we will administer some vaccinations every 3 years like Rabies and the combo DHPP, while other vaccines will need to be given every year.

If the risk of Infectious Canine Cough (misnamed Kennel Cough or also Bordatella) is real a vaccine against bordetella is recommended, the intranasal one is most effective The bordetella vaccine needs to be given at least yearly, and each year you and your veterinarian should assess whether it is required.

The rabies vaccine should be given as recommended by local law. Newer vaccines against Leptospirosis and Lyme disease have become important in our area as well. Again your veterinarian together with you will be able to asses the risks. Other vaccinations that are sometimes given by your veterinarian include coronavirus, Lyme and giardia. These are not routinely given to every animal, and their use should be discussed with your veterinarian.

Our Policy for Adult Dogs

  • DAPP and Rabies: 3 Years;
  • Lepto, Lyme, Bordatella: Every Year

If your adult dog has an adverse reaction to the vaccine (fever, vomiting, shaking, facial swelling or hives) please mention it to your veterinarian before administering the vaccines.

Recommendations

The foremost recommendation is to discuss the vaccination program with your veterinarian. Don’t be hesitant to ask questions about the pros and cons of vaccinations.

Heartworm prevention is essential for dogs wherever mosquitos can bite

Heartworm prevention

Canine heartworm disease is a serious parasitic disease caused by a long, thin worm that lives in the blood vessels and heart of infected dogs. The disease is spread from dog to dog (and to cat) by mosquitoes. The mosquito bites a dog with heartworm infection, collects some of the microscopic heartworm offspring and then, after a couple of weeks, passes these on to another dog or cat.

The important thing is to prevent worm development using safe and effective preventative drugs.

Prevention

Prevention of heartworm disease is simple. In most cases, a once-monthly prescription treatment is all that is needed to effectively protect your pet. These preventatives are only available from your veterinarian, who must first make certain that your dog is not heartworm positive. These “preventatives” kill microscopic larvae that are left behind by mosquitoes when they bite a dog.

Before beginning heartworm prevention, any dog over 7 months of age should first have a heartworm test. Preventatives in heartworm positive dogs can cause severe reactions. Repeated heartworm blood testing every year is recommended even for dogs taking heartworm preventative year round. Previous recommendations were for every 1 – 3 year testing but this changed with the 2005 American Heartworm Society (AHS) recommendations to yearly testing. This is due to concern with breaks of pets on preventatives that still contracted heartworms. Annual testing will ensure that an infection is caught in plenty of time to effectively manage it. Testing is also recommended when a pet owner switches between preventative medications.

Recommendations

The AHS recommends that all dogs in areas endemic for heartworms should take a year-round preventative. If you are not certain about the danger of heartworms in your area, call your veterinarian. Any pet that can be bitten by a mosquito is at risk for heartworm disease. Some heartworm preventatives also control intestinal or external parasites. The wide range of excellent and safe heartworm prescription products can be explained by your veterinarian.Canine heartworm disease is a serious parasitic disease caused by a long, thin worm that lives in the blood vessels and heart of infected dogs. The disease is spread from dog to dog (and to cat) by mosquitoes.